“Free” Holiday Treat Recipes

December is supposed to be “the most wonderful time of the year.” And many of us agree with that sentiment—there is so much joy and excitement in the air. Even so, the holidays can be an especially stressful time for children with type 1 diabetes and their caregivers, what with all the get-togethers and parties, most of which are overflowing with sugary, carbohydrate-dense treats.

So how do we ensure that our kids can enjoy this time of year without having to worry about treats that could make their blood sugar soar? The next time you host a gathering or have to bring something for the school party spread, consider serving one or more of these three healthy holiday treats: Each is fun and festive but made up of “free” foods—those that have fewer than 20 calories and 5 grams of carbs per serving—so everyone can graze a little more merrily.

Festive Tree Platter

Festive Tree Platter

This party platter is made up of virtually carbohydrate-free ingredients. What’s even better is that you can tweak it to your children’s likes and dislikes. Not into dairy? Add more rows of the vegetables they love best. Not big veggie eaters? Add more meats and cheeses. That said, you may be pleasantly surprised at how much more responsive kids can be when healthy foods are simply presented in a different way. Tomatoes on their own may not be as appealing, but when they crown a colorful Christmas tree, little ones may just gobble them up.

Cheese Stick Snowmen

Cheese Stick Snowmen

Even picky eaters tend to love string cheese sticks, and most have zero carb grams, making them an easy snack for kids with type 1 diabetes. It’s what you do to the packaging that makes these particular cheese sticks so fun and festive!

Strawberry Santas

Strawberry Santas

With just three ingredients, these Strawberry Santas are the perfect sweet treat for a holiday party. Older kids may even enjoy helping to make them. The best part: Each one has only 3 grams of carbs!

 

Related topics:
Healthy Holiday Treat Recipes
Parents’ Favorite Holiday T1D Tips
People in the Know: Holiday Traditions vs. Stress

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Disclaimer: The experiences and suggestions recounted in these articles are not intended as medical advice, and they are not necessarily the "typical" experiences of families with a child who has type 1 diabetes. These situations are unique to the families depicted. Families should check with their healthcare professionals regarding the treatment of type 1 diabetes and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring.