Steak Fajitas Freezer Meal

These steak fajitas have totally overtaken Taco Tuesdays in my house. My son with type 1 diabetes loves them, and I love giving them to him, because the entire recipe is pretty healthy and relatively low-carb. And it’s one meal that actually fills him up — an increasingly difficult feat for this growing preteen — without having to add a bunch of side dishes.

Another thing I love about fajitas is that they’re so customizable. We make a very basic meat mixture, which contains the perfect amount of spice for the kids’ palates, and then we can spice up the adult portions by adding a salsa with more heat. Serve the fajitas with your favorite tortillas or as a fajita bowl over a bed of shredded lettuce.

Serves: 4

Nutritional Information

Serving Size: 1 fajita (including tortilla; not including cheese, salsa, or sour cream)
268 14g 10g 21g 25g

Ingredients

  • 1 pound sliced flank steak
  • 3 cups sliced bell peppers (any color)
  • 2 cups thinly sliced onion
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • ½ teaspoon cumin
  • ¼ teaspoon garlic powder
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 8 small low-carb tortillas
  • Optional toppings: sour cream, salsa, shredded cheddar cheese

How To Make It

  1. In a gallon-size plastic freezer bag, combine steak, peppers, onion, and seasonings.
  2. Place tortillas in another gallon-size plastic freezer bag.
  3. Place any optional toppings (sour cream, salsa, cheese, green onions) each in a separate sandwich-size freezer bag.
  4. Bundle all bags together in one large plastic bag. Label with meal name and date. Freeze until ready to use.
  5. When ready to serve the fajitas, thaw bag(s) in the refrigerator, preferably overnight.
  6. Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add contents of steak, pepper, and onion bag into the skillet; cook 15 to 20 minutes or until steak is cooked through.
  7. Warm tortillas in the microwave. Top with steak mixture, divided eight ways.
  8. Add optional toppings if desired.
Disclaimer: The experiences and suggestions recounted in these articles are not intended as medical advice, and they are not necessarily the "typical" experiences of families with a child who has type 1 diabetes. These situations are unique to the families depicted. Families should check with their healthcare professionals regarding the treatment of type 1 diabetes and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring.