Gearing up for an Independence Day barbecue but don’t know what to make? Thankfully, the Fourth of July is one holiday that isn’t quite as known for sugary treats as many of the others. Most of us celebrate with parades, fireworks, and cook-outs, which can involve much more carb-friendly options.

But as any of us tied to type 1 diabetes knows, every get-together seems to pose some hurdles, even if it’s just trying to guestimate a carb count at the buffet table. Bringing a few of your own offerings—like one of the carb-counted recipes below—can help. One is a savory appetizer, one a sweet dessert, and the other a cool snack; all are easy to make and relatively kind on the blood sugar.

We might not be able to celebrate independence from insulin, but we can help ensure a great time celebrating the Fourth without stressing about blood sugar!

Rocket Pops

Rocket Pops

Want the kids at your Fourth of July party to have a blast? Treat them with these yummy rocket pops! They’re a homemade and healthy version of the classic ice pop, and they only require three ingredients. If your kids are anything like mine, they’ll enjoy getting to each layer and letting you know which one they like most.

Patriotic Deviled Eggs

Patriotic Deviled Eggs

Here’s a festive and healthier twist on a barbecue classic. They’re made with yogurt instead of mayonnaise, plus one extra step that makes ordinary deviled eggs look extraordinary!

Phyllo Berry Tarts

Phyllo Berry Tarts

You won’t believe how simple yet delicious these berry tarts are. They’re the ideal barbecue dessert—bite-sized, self-contained, and perfect for little fingers! For an extra festive touch, assemble the tarts on a large platter to resemble the American flag.

Related topics:
Kid-Approved BBQ Recipes From Lilly Diabetes and Disney’s T1D Cookbook
Dishing It Up Disney Style: A Cookbook for Families with Type 1 Diabetes
A Day at the Beach, Water Park, or Theme Park

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Disclaimer

Disclaimer: The experiences and suggestions recounted in these articles are not intended as medical advice, and they are not necessarily the "typical" experiences of families with a child who has type 1 diabetes. These situations are unique to the families depicted. Families should check with their healthcare professionals regarding the treatment of type 1 diabetes and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring.