Tough T1 Foods Transformed

We all know that no food is off-limits to our kids with type 1 diabetes. But there are some foods that just seem to give us so much trouble with blood sugar that we tend to avoid them nonetheless. Pizza, anyone?

Fortunately, alternatives do exist for many of these foods, and here I’m sharing three of our favorites. Feast your eyes on diabetes-friendly pizza, tacos, and donuts! Of course, we still indulge in “the real thing” sometimes, but these healthier versions work much better for us in the regular meal and snack rotation.

Apple Donuts

Apple Donuts

One could argue that there are still carbs and sugar in apples and yogurt. But apple donuts have half the carbs of a normal donut, and I personally feel a lot better giving my kids whole fruit and protein-rich dairy (with mostly natural sugars) rather than a ton of added sugar and white flour. There’s no contest as to which will be friendlier to blood sugar, which is my ultimate goal.

BBQ Chicken Pizza Muffins

BBQ Chicken Pizza Muffins

Nothing can make a parent of a child with type 1 diabetes groan like hearing the word “pizza.” Let’s face it: Pizza is everywhere, from birthday parties to sporting events to school. And despite my best efforts and practices, traditional pizza is a food that always seems to negatively affect blood sugar management for my son. So would you believe me if I told you I had a recipe for low-carb barbecue chicken pizza muffins that taste amazing, are less likely to send blood sugar soaring, and are super easy to make?

Cheese Shell Tacos

Cheese Shell Tacos

We’ve experimented with other tortillas that are lower in carbs and have even made our own from more blood-sugar-friendly ingredients. Nothing has beaten the simplicity and deliciousness of these cheese-shell tacos. That’s right — the taco shell is made solely out of shredded cheddar cheese, giving each taco shell just 2 carb grams. You still get the same great flavors, and you really don’t even miss the tortilla!

 

Disclaimer: The experiences and suggestions recounted in these articles are not intended as medical advice, and they are not necessarily the "typical" experiences of families with a child who has type 1 diabetes. These situations are unique to the families depicted. Families should check with their healthcare professionals regarding the treatment of type 1 diabetes and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring.